Spam Gallery–Your Order For Helicopter

The Spam Gallery is a series of posts that give examples of spam messages, explaining telltales signs of how they are spam.

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This spam message is just pretty humorous.  Here’s the things I can see wrong:

  • Poor grammar for a business email.
  • Times in 12hr and 24hr format
  • Currency incorrectly formatted
  • Email address of sender inconsistent with name
  • “Single choice” link in email
  • No contact information of company
  • No personalized greeting or other identifying information.

The email may pique curiosity, so that you want to click the link to see what the total cost of renting a helicopter would be.  Think of someone approaching you on the street and saying, “Wanna see a dead body?”

Spam Gallery – Manager

The Spam Gallery is a series of posts that give examples of spam messages, explaining telltales signs of how they are spam.

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This email is clearly spam.  The numerous spelling and grammar errors throughout should be enough to discredit it completely.  Some of the mistakes are strange and humorous.  “Up to 50,000 USD per annum”, after which I guess your pay simply stops?  “Vacant educational training”? “PayPal Manager”?

This spam falls under a similar type as online dating scams, where you voluntarily give information to the scammers.  If you send your resume to this email address, they have quite a good leg up on stealing your identity.  If they want more, they can simply say that you are hired and ask for your SSN and banking information for payroll.  Then what?

This email has no contact information.  There is a name, which is unverifiable.  There is a company name, which doesn’t match the domain of the email address (gmx.us is a free email host).  There is no address, website, or phone number.  This is just like other “single choice” emails, where you can only do one thing in the email, and that is exactly what the spammer wants.

Beware of too-good-to-be-true offers.  If this was a job offer, wouldn’t you want to research the company first?  There’s no links to the company website.

Spam Gallery–Reward Notification

The Spam Gallery is a series of posts that give examples of spam messages, explaining telltales signs of how they are spam.

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This piece of mail has an interesting trait of being a forgery of another spam service.  Gift Certificate Delivery.com is probably a legitimate business, but assuredly is one that should not exist.  In any case, this email is using their email template to get you to click the links and get infected.

The email uses the first part of the email address (JSmith, jane.doe) to give it legitimacy, but a real email from a real company would use your real name.  They would have that in their database.  The other clue is that the links all direct to latestyearsvacation.info, which has nothing to do with gift certificates, rewards, or anything else. 

One thing that is interesting though, is t the spammers actually purchased a valid domain name and hosting services to host their infection files.  Usually, the files would be hosted on a hacked legitimate website in a hidden folder so the spammers wouldn’t have to pay anything.

Always check the link addresses, and don’t  assume you’re getting something for free.  That’s not the way the world works.